Technical Resources

Application Notes | Published Works | Videos

A Collection of resources created in collaboration with our customers to better the understanding of our products

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Application Notes

Applications Developed by customers in use with our products

Determination of Hexavalent Chromium in Water by Ion Exchange – ICP MS with the Filter Vials

no citations

This method utilizes a hyphenated technique, Ion Exchange Chromatography (IC) coupled to an Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) to determine Cr(VI) in treated drinking water, surface water, and ground water.

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Analysis of Antibiotics in Honey by an Integrated On-Line Extraction UHPLC-MS/MS System

Zicheng Yang and Louis Maljers, Bruker Daltonics Inc.
Poster presented as part of NACRW 2015 Conference, St. Petersburg, FL., 19-22 July 2015.

The most critical aspects of reliable food contamination analysis are the reduction of interferences from the sample matrix and analyte recovery. ... Improved sample prep methods were developed using eXtreme|FV for contaminant analysis of antibiotics honey.

Screening and Quantitation of 200+ Pesticides in Honey by an Integrated On-Line Extraction UHPLC-MS/MS System

Zicheng Yang and Louis Maljers, Bruker Daltonics Inc.
Poster presented as part of NACRW 2015 Conference, St. Petersburg, FL., 19-22 July 2015.

[A] simple, cost effective and sensitive procedure for screening and quantitation of pesticides in honey using the Thomson eXtreme|Filter Vials for sample clean-up[.]

Analysis of Nitrosamines in Tobacco with eXtreme|FV® by LC-MS

no citations

[N]itrosamines (TSNA) are a group of carcinogens found only in tobacco ... method describes a simple robust sample preparation utilizing the Thomson Filter Vials for in-vial filtration[.]

EPA Method 539: Determination of Hormones in Drinking Water by SPE and LC-ESI-MS/MS with eXtreme|FV®

no citations

Method 539, Determination of Hormones in Drinking Water by ... [SPE] and ... [LCESI-MS/MS] method for the determination of hormones in finished drinking water.

Expedited Vitamin C Sample Preparation Through the Use of eXtreme|FV® Technology

Heidi Evenocheck, John Habel, Xun Yan
Analytical Sciences, Amway, 7575 Street E, Ada, MI 49355. Expedited Vitamin C sample
preparation through the use of vial filtration technology. Poster presented as part of 128th
Annual AOAC Meeting and Expo, Boca Rotan, FL, 7-10 September 2014.

Vitamin C Analysis is routinely performed for large numbers of samples. ... eXtreme|FV® reduce a multi-step filtration and vial transfer process to a single step.

eXtreme|FV® vs SPE for the Analysis of Pesticides in Orange Juice by GC/MS

Authors: Uday Sathe1, Karine Aylozyan1, Lisa Wanders2, Joe Machamer2, & Sam Ellis2
1Micro Quality Labs
2Thomson Instrument Company

Pesticides act as toxins when found in sufficient quantities as residues in food. Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) is a common sample preparation technique used prior to GC or LC analysis of pesticides in food. eXtreme|FV® offer multi-layer filtration for viscous samples and samples containing up to 30% solid particulates.

Filtration of Shellfish Extracts prior to final dilution for domoic acid (ASP; AMNESIC Shellfish Poisoning) analysis by HPLC

Data supplied by Canadian Food Inspection Agency

[A]mnesic shellfish poisoning (ASP) toxin, domoic acid, belongs to a group of amino acids, called the kainoids, which are classed as neuroexcitants or excitoxins that interfere with the neurotransmission mechanisms in the brain. ... Filter Vials were evaluated for inclusion in the validated method, replacing filtration using a syringe, syringe filter and transfer to the HPLC Autosampler Vial.

Screening and Quantitation of 250 Pesticides in Apple, Cranberry, Orange, Vegetable and White Grape Juices using the eXtreme|FV® by LC/MS/MS

Z.Yang, L. Maljers, Bruker, Chemical & Applied Markets (CAM) Division. “Screening and Quantitation of 250 Pesticides in Fruit Juices with Positive/Negative Switching LC/MS/MS.” Poster presented as part of NACRW-FPRW Conference, St. Petersburg, FL., 20-23 July 2014.

[A]nalysis of 250 pesticides in store-bought juice using one method and simple sample preparation using the Thomson [eXtreme|FV®] in a dilute-and-shoot approach without sample enrichment ... sample preparation is explored using eXtreme|FV® for sample clean-up instead of lengthy alternatives like SPE or centrifugation followed by liquid-liquid extraction.

Routine Targeted Quantitation & Identification of Pesticide Residues in Avocado, Carrot, Grape & Orange using the eXtreme|FV® by LC-MS/MS

A. Schreiber, AB SCIEX, Concord, ON, Canada; J. Jasak, AB SCIEX, Darmstadt, Germany. “Routine Targeted Quantitation and Identification of Pesticide Residues using Triple Quadrupole LC-MS/MS and Advanced Scheduling of MRM Transitions” Poster presented as part of NACRW-FPRW Conference, St. Petersburg, FL., 20-23 July 2014.

Thomson eXtreme|FV®s for clean-up, and the Sciex Scheduled MRM Pro Algorithm for identification of pesticides in fruit and vegetables analysis.

Tea Analysis with eXtreme|FV® by GC-MS

no citations

This method investigates whether SPE is required for the analysis of pesticides in green tea leaves using GC-MS.

Sample Preparation for the Analysis of 12 Opiates in Urine using the Thomson eXtreme Filter Vials® by LCMS/MS

Nadine Koenig2, Crystal Xander2, Melanie Stauffer2, Dean Fritch3
1Health Network Laboratories, Allentown, PA.
2Analytical Asociates, Inc,. East Greenville, PA

This improved sample preparation method allows for the quantitative measurement of Opioids in urine. ... samples are hydrolyzed, then prepared using the eXtreme|FV® followed by LC/MS/MS analysis.

Quick and Easy Sample Preparation of Urine for the Analysis of Psychoactive Drugs using the Thomson eXtreme|FV® by LC-MS/MS

Nadine Koenig2, Crystal Xander2, Melanie Stauffer2, Dean Fritch3
1Health Network Laboratories, Allentown, PA.
2Analytical Asociates, Inc,. East Greenville, PA

This improved sample preparation method allows for the quantitative measurement of Benzodiazepines ... urine samples were prepared using the eXtreme|FV®, followed by LC/MS/MS analysis.

Improved Method for the Analysis of a Pain Management Supplemental Panel in Urine using the Thomson eXtreme|FV® by LC-MS/MS

Nadine Koenig2, Crystal Xander2, Melanie Stauffer2, Dean Fritch3
1Health Network Laboratories, Allentown, PA.
2Analytical Asociates, Inc,. East Greenville, PA

Traditionally, SPE, SLE and centrifugation have been used to reduce matrix interference prior to MS analysis. ... eXtreme|FV® ... offer multi-layer filtration for viscous samples and samples containing up to 30% solid particulates.

Improved Sample Preparation Methods for Athlete Doping Analysis of Common Compounds in Urine by LCMS

Authors : Dr. Catrin Goebel2, Lisa Wanders1, Sam Ellis1
1Thomson Instrument Company 2Australian Sports Drug Testing Laboratory in the National Measurement Institute Department of Industry

The Australian Sports Drug Testing Laboratory, ... invested time in determining a limited number of comprehensive screening methods. These methods, using Thomson’s eXtreme|FV® ... , comply with the World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA) Prohibited List.

Improved Method for the Analysis of 31 Drugs of Abuse in Oral Fluid samples using the Thomson eXtreme|FV® by LC-MS/MS

Nadine Koenig2, Crystal Xander2, Melanie Stauffer2, Dean Fritch3
1Health Network Laboratories, Allentown, PA.
2Analytical Asociates, Inc,. East Greenville, PA

The goal of this study was to improve the sample preparation for the analysis of drugs of abuse/pain management panels in oral fluids. The oral fluid samples were collected with Intercept® i2he™ Oral Fluid Collection Devices. The diluted oral fluid samples were filtered using Thomson Filter Vials, followed by LC/MS/MS analysis.

Cost Effective Dilute and shoot Approach For Determination of Illicit Drugs in Oral Fluids Using LC-MS/MS

Kavinda De Silva, Mariko Nakano, Siobhan McKenney-Hara
Molecular Testing Labs, Vancouver, WA
Presented at MSCAL 2016

Due to a recent increase in the demand of oral fluid analysis, many challenges have been set forth in developing robust and cost effective assays for determination of illicit drugs. Forensic testing on oral fluids has been increasingly appreciated due to reduction in time, simplicity of collection and reduction of adulteration and substitution. Thus, we developed a simplified and robust assay using filtering vials.

Aggregation Determination using nano|FV™ by SEC

no citations

The aggregation of protein therapeutics has become a major concern for the pharmaceutical industry and regulatory agencies. ... Antibodies are clarified using Thomson nano|Filter Vials® ... , and analyzed for purity using SEC

Analysis of Sinapoylmalate in the Arabidopsis thaliana Leaf by Using the nano|Filter Vial®: Sinapoyl Malate is a major UV protectant in Arabidopsis thaliana

Data provided by Jing-Ke Weng, Ph.D.
Member, Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research
Assistant Professor of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

We use the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana to examine the in vivo function and behavior of mutant enzymes that exhibit broadened product promiscuity and/or decreased folding stability in vitro. We attempt to identify genetic components involved in cellular mechanisms that assist folding or alter product profile of these mutant enzymes.

Optimum Growth™ Protocol for Insect Cells

Multiple citations

... Sf9 and Sf21 insect cells are cell lines commonly used for expression of recombinant proteins using baculovirus systems. These cell lines were generated from the parental cell line IPBLSF21, which was derived from the pupal ovarian tissue of the fall army worm ... Sf9, Sf21, Hi5, and S2 are all compatible with the Optimum Growth™ flasks ...

High Throughput Screening and confirmation of 41 Pain Panel Drugs in Oral Fluid by an Integrated On-Line Extraction UHPLC-MS/MS System

Louis Maljers, Zicheng Yang
Bruker Daltonics Inc., 3500 West Warren Ave, Fremont, CA 94538
Presented at MSACL 2015

Saliva test is one of the easiest, cost-effective and most accurate ways to measure the presence of drugs in the body. Collecting saliva sample is relatively non-invasive, easier to procure and reduced risk of sample adulteration. However, saliva matrix display much lower levels of drug compounds compared to urine samples, making the need to test at lower cut-off levels more important. ... Here we present a high throughput, cost effective and sensitive procedure for screening and confirmation of Pain Panel Drugs (PPDs) in Synthetic Saliva using Thomson filter vial for sample preparation and using an integrated On-Line Extraction (OLE)-UHPLC-MS/MS System for sample analysis.

eXtreme|FV® Extraction for the Detection of 11 Antidepressants in Oral Fluid Samples

Sarah Muller1, Jill Yeakel1, Lisa Wanders2
1Lehigh Valley Toxicology, Bethlehem, PA
2Thomson Instrument Company, Oceanside, CA
Presented at SOFT 2016

The benefits of using oral fluid as a biological matrix include the ability to detect recent drug use, ease of collection, and the collection process can be observed to prevent adulteration of the sample. ... Thomson eXtreme Filter Vials provide a simple and efficient extraction technique that has demonstrated adequate analyte recovery, reduced matrix interferences and the elimination of solvent waste and other consumables. This project specifically explores the efficacy of these vials in extracting a wide range of antidepressants in oral fluid specimens.

Simplified Sample Prep for Open Access SEC-HPLC Detection using the Thomson Filter Vials

Srilaxmi Sarikonda, Nathan P. Oien, Ph.D. and James G. Smedley III, Ph.D.
Analytical Development, KBI Biopharma, Research Triangle Park, NC

Routine analysis of samples containing cell culture media and/or supernatant by HPLC can lead to performance issues and can require frequent purchasing of new columns and increased HPLC maintenance. ... Here, we demonstrate that using Thomson [filter vials]] during sample preparation results in minimal impact preparation time, no detectable loss in product, and improved column performance leading to extended column lifetimes.

Evaluating the Impact of High Pluronic® F68 Concentrations on Antibody Producing CHO Cell Lines

Tharmala Tharmalingam, Chetan T. Goudar
Cell Science & Technology, Process & Product Development, Amgen Inc. One Amgen
Center Drive, Thousand Oaks 91320, California; telephone: 8054475321;
fax: 805-499-6819; e-mail: cgoudar@amgen.com

Routine analysis of samples containing cell culture media and/or supernatant by HPLC can lead to performance issues and can require frequent purchasing of new columns and increased HPLC maintenance. ... Here, we demonstrate that using Thomson [filter vials]] during sample preparation results in minimal impact preparation time, no detectable loss in product, and improved column performance leading to extended column lifetimes.

Pesticide Analysis in Ground Water

Olga Almaraz, Blake Gentry, Stephanie Benton, Steven Perez
Adpen Laboratories, Inc., 11757 Central Parkway, Jacksonville, Florida 32224

Groundwater is an important component in many industrial processes as well as irrigating our crops and recharging lakes, rivers and wetlands. Groundwater supplies drinking water for 51% of the total U.S. population and 99% of its rural population. Unfortunately, groundwater is susceptible to pollutants due to the widespread use of pesticides and fertilizers. Traditionally, syringe filtration or centrifugation have been used to remove particulates and reduce possible matrix interference prior to LC/ MS analysis. However, these techniques are time consuming, adversely impact reproducibility and quantification. We investigated the potential for streamlining sample preparation method for the analysis of Prosulfuron and its metabolites in ground water using the Thomson Standard|FV compared to syringe filtration and centrifugation.

Improved DNA Protocol for E.coli with Plasmid+® Media

no citations

Plasmid+® liquid media is an enriched media specifically designed for plasmid DNA production. Plasmid+® supports much higher cell densities and plasmid yields than LB media. Optimal shake flask yields are achieved using Ultra Yield™ Flasks (Thomson Instrument Company), which facilitates maximum culture aeration. PLASMID+® media may also be used in a bioreactor with continuous aeration and agitation.

Comparison of the Rapid Clear® Cap 3000 (patented) vs GE Capsule Filters for clarifying monospecific IgG

no citations

Two methods to clarify 10L of post transfected IgG harvested from culture are compared. The culture was harvested on day 4 with 75% viability and a yield of 3.44e6/mL VCD.

Automated Hydrolysis and Sample Preparation for the Analysis of 12 Opiates in Urine using the Thomson eXtreme Filter Vials® by LC-MS/MS

Presented at MSACL 2017
Nadine Koenig1, Crystal Xander1, Melanie Stauffer1, Dean Fritch2
1 Health Network Laboratories, 794 Roble Road, Allentown, PA 18109
2 Analytical Associates, 225 Millwood Drive, East Greenville, PA

This improved sample preparation method allows for the quantitative measurement of Opioids in urine. Opioids are highly addictive and affects nearly 5 million people in the U.S. Opioids include naturally occurring Opiates, semi-synthetic opioids derived from morphine and synthetic opioids. are analgesic alkaloids found naturally in Papaver somniferum, poppy plant. The use of hydrolysis in the analysis of natural and synthetic opiates in urine has become standard practice in forensic toxicology. Many laboratories currently use solid phase extraction or solid liquid extraction techniques in the sample preparation of urine for the analysis for opiates. This improved automated sample preparation method evaluates the robustness for the quantitative measurement of opiates in urine without the need for SPE/SLE thereby reducing pipetting errors. The sample preparation of incurred urine, controls, standards and internal standard additions as well as the hydrolysis step are performed by a liquid handler. The Thomson eXtreme Filter Vials provide a simple and efficient extraction technique that has demonstrated adequate analyte recovery, reduced matrix interferences and the reduction of solvent and consumable waste.

Time saving sample prep for the analysis of 54 pesticide & aflatoxin residues in Cannabis by LC-MS/MS

Presented at NACRW 2017
Kavinda De Silva1, Tami Nguyen1
1 Molecular Testing Labs, Vancouver, WA 98684

Pesticide analysis of cannabis leaves and finished goods is becoming increasingly important as many states are legalizing it for medicinal and recreational purposes. Dosing methods include smoking/vaporizing and edibles but cannabis is still a Schedule 1 illegal drug and therefore have no FDA testing guidelines. Trace levels of pesticides can be incurred during cultivation or inhaled from dried pesticides on the cannabis. This study evaluates the sample preparation aspect for LC-MS/ MS analysis of a 50+ analyte panel of pesticides, fungicides and aflatoxins. QuEChERS was used to extract the analytes from the cannabis flowers, followed by centrifugation and Thomson Standard Filter Vial for sample clean-up.

Time and Cost Effective Methods for Reducing Background Noise and Signal Suppression in Problem Matrices for Residue Analysis by LC-MS/MS

Presented at NACRW 2016
Joseph Kolb1, Ariana Ramdin1, Ryan Undeen1
1Merieux NutriSciences Corporation, Gainsville, FL 32607

Several clean-up methods are compared for background reduction, analyte recovery, and cost effectiveness in order to successfully analyze a wide variety of multiclass multiresidues in difficult matrices including Chili Powder and Tobacco. The most critical aspects of reliable multiresidue analysis are the reduction of interferences from the sample matrix and analyte recovery. eXtreme|FV®, were compared to an existing ISO accredited QuEChERS method, as well as a dilute and shoot approach are analyzed in conjunction with different filtration techniques for residue analysis by LC-MS/MS for minimal number of steps, speed, reduced reagent use and reduced cost.

Detection of THC in Oral Fluid: The Bane of a Toxicologist’s Existence

Jill Yeakel
Lehigh Valley Toxicology
MSACL 2017 Oral Presentation

It is critical that samples collected in a clinical setting meet the requirments for compliance or drug monitoring. Urine samples can be difficult to obtain in patients with medical conditions, elderly, and drug addicts. Urine samples have a long detection window but require large measurable volume and are easily adulturated. While Oral Fluids, have a shorter detection window, the sample is easily collected with minimal invasion of privacy and the collection can be observed making it difficult to adulturate. This shorter window with Oral Fluids, in most cases allows for confirmation of recent ingestion, active drug versus metabolites.

eXtreme Filter Vial Extraction for the Detection of Fentanyl & Analogues in Oral Fluid Samples

Stevi Hooper1, Jill Yeakel1, Lisa Wanders2
1Lehigh Valley Toxicology, Bethlehem, PA 2Thomson Instrument Company, Oceanside, CA
Presented at MSACL 2018

Use of oral fluid (saliva) in toxicology has been increasing within recent years due to its non-invasive, low cost effectiveness in recent drug use detection. There is little opportunity for adulteration of the sample and a large volume is not required for collection and analysis. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has proven to be a useful tool in the analysis of oral fluid due to its ability to run highly sensitive assays1. The necessity for a sensitive assay is especially important in the detection of an analyte and its analogues that are administered in low concentrations. Detection of fentanyl and its analogues such as furanyl fentanyl and sufentanil, have become important due to the increasing widespread use of illicit fentanyl formulations in heroin and counterfeit opioid tablet formulations. Suppliers of illicit heroin are developing fentanyl analogues and including them as cutting agents in the final product due to their high potency and relatively low production cost2. As a result, development of a method to detect these compounds has become vital to many toxicology labs. Thomson eXtreme Filter Vials provide a simple and efficient extraction technique that has demonstrated adequate analyte recovery, reduced matrix interferences from a simple dilute-and-shoot method and the elimination of solvent waste and other consumables. This project specifically explores the efficacy of these vials in extracting a range of fentanyl analogues in oral fluid specimens.

eXtreme|FV® for sample prep prior to the analysis of cannabinoids by HPLC-UV

no citations

Analysis of cannabinoids in marijuana flower, hemp and finished goods is becoming increasingly important as many states are legalizing it for medicinal and recreational purposes. Dosing methods include smoking/vaporizing and edibles but cannabis is still a Schedule 1 illegal drug and therefore have no FDA testing guidelines. This study evaluates streamlining the sample preparation aspect for HPLC-UV analysis of a panel of cannbinoids. The following analytes were used: ...

THC analysis in candy using the eXtreme|FV for sample prep

no citations

What are the challenges faced by analytical labs working with edibles? Measuring the chemical contents and accuately labelling edible products has been a challenge to the cannabis industry. A recent study published by the Journal of the American Medical Society (JAMA) regarding cannabinoid (mis)-labeling in edible medical cannabis products, Dr. Ryan Vandrey of Johns Hopkins School of Medicine looked at 75 products from 47 separate brands purchased at medical dispensaries. Items included baked goods, beverages, and chocolate/candy. Their criteria for selection included those items with a specifically-stated cannabinoid content level. The results, indicated only 17% of edibles tested were “accurately” labeled. The results indicated a +/- 10% range of the stated THC content for beverages and baked goods while baked goods where off by +/- 25%. This could lead to over and under usage which could represent a safety concern. We looked at streamlining the sample prep and analysis of THC in candy.

Clinical Urine Mega Method by LC-MS/MS

Nadine Koenig1, Crystal Xander1, Melanie Stauffer1, Dean Fritch2
1 Health Network Laboratories, 794 Roble Road, Allentown, PA 18109
2 Analytical Associates, 225 Millwood Drive, East Greenville, PA
Presented at MSACL 2019

This improved sample preparation method allows for the quantitative measurement of over 60 drugs of different classes in urine for clinical purposes. Drugs of abuse include naturally occurring, semi-synthetic and synthetic drugs. The use of hydrolysis in the analysis of natural and synthetic drugs in urine has become standard practice in toxicology labs. Many laboratories currently use solid phase extraction or solid liquid extraction techniques in the sample preparation of urine. This method quantitatively measures multiple drugs of different classes in urine for clinical purposes. This method is known as the CLUMM (Clinical Urine Mega Method) and run on the Sciex 4500 using the Phenomenex Phenyl-hexyl Kinetex analytical column. The samples are hydrolyzed, then prepared using a dilute and filter technique followed by LC/MS/MS analysis.

Videos

How To's & Applications in video format

An Overview of Filter Vials

Overview of the Thomson Filter Vial Line

How to use a Filter Vial

How to use a Filter Vial

How to use the Multi-Use Press

How to use the Thomson Multi-Use Press to filter up to 48 Filter Vials at once.

Sample Loss With Syringe Filters

Video showcasing Pfizer data on sample loss with syringe filters compared to Thomson Filter Vials.

Syringe Filter Dangers

Video showing the dangers of using syringe filters: blockage and explosions, dangerous aerosols. Compared to Thomson Filter Vials clean and contained sampling properties.

The Filter Vial Revolution

A laboratory technician frustrated with syringe filters discovers the simple and effective Thomson Filter Vial.

Front End Full Automation for Filter Vials (Autosampler Ready) Grabber D885 (Brechbuler) for PAL System

Front End Full Automation for Filter Vials (Autosampler Ready) Grabber D885 (Brechbuler) for PAL System.

How to use an eXtreme|FV® PVDF

Using the eXtreme|FV with a PVDF membrane in food applications.

Improved Method for the Analysis of a Pain Management Supplemental Panel in Urine using the Thomson eXtreme|FV® by LC-MS/MS

Video showing the steps in using a Thomson Filter Vial in analyzing urine for a pain management supplemental panel. Uses Thomson eXtreme|FV by LC-MS/MS.

Improved Method for the Analysis of 31 Drugs of Abuse in Oral Fluid samples using the Thomson eXtreme|FV® by LC-MS/MS

Video showing steps in application for analyzing oral fluids for 31 drugs of abuse, using Thomson eXtreme|FV and OraSure Intercept i2he oral fluid collector.

eXtreme|FV® for Antibody Analysis

Video showing the application steps needed to analyze antibodies with Thomson eXtreme|FV.

Pharmaceutical & Food Sample Filtration with eXtractor|FV®

Video showing the process of using the eXtractor3D|FV for pharmaceutical and food sample filtration.

Optimum Growth for PhytoPlankton Production

Video supplied by customer showing the Optimum Growth 5L flask in phyto plankton growth.

Optimum Growth Flasks with Sample Port for Insect and Mammalian Cells

Video showing the use of the Thomson Optimum Growth 5L with Sample Port being used to take samples from the flask in the shaker.

Optimum Growth Flasks with Sample Port for Algae

Video showing the Thomson Optimum Growth 5L Flask with sample port in sampling algae production in the shaker.

Alternative to Sticky Mats

Video showing the use of rug mats in a shaker instead of traditional sticky mats.

125mL & 250mL Optimum Growth™ Flask Carrier

Video showcasing the use of Thomson flask carrier from shaker to hood for sampling with Thomson Optimum Growth 125mL or 250mL flasks.

Bidirectional Transfer Cap Options

Video showing the use of the Thomson bidirectional transfer cap options.

Transfer Cap with 7/16" O.D. Male Quick Connect

Video showcasing the Thomson Transfer Cap for Optimum Growth flasks with a 7/16" O.D. Male Quick Connect to a cell bag with inversion transfer in and out of the hood.

Transfer Cap with 1/4" OD Barbed Quick Connect

Video showcasing the Thomson Transfer Cap for Optimum Growth flasks with a 1/4" barbed quick connect to a cell bag with inversion transfer in and out of the hood.

Transfer Cap for Tube Fusing to 7/16" for welding C-Flex 24

Video showcasing the Thomson Transfer Cap for Optimum Growth flasks using a C-Flex 24 tube fusing connection to a cell bag with inversion transfer in and out of the hood.

Transfer Cap for Tube Fusing to 1/4" for welding C-Flex 16

Video showcasing the Thomson Transfer Cap for Optimum Growth flasks using a C-Flex 16 tube fusing connection to a cell bag with inversion transfer in and out of the hood.

HT Infors/ATR Shakers & Ultra Yield Flasks™

Video showing the use of Thomson Ultra Yield Flasks with Plasmid+ Media and AirOtop Enhanced Flask Seals in the hood and using a HT Infors/ART shaker for E. coli production.

Rapid Clear® Cap

Rapid Clear® Cap provides 0.2μm sterile filtration for clarifying cell culture in a fraction of the time required my traditional methods.

Published Works

Published Articles, Trade Show Posters, & Presentations
Poster

Time and Cost Effective Methods for Reducing Background Noise and Signal Suppression in Problem Matrices for Residue Analysis by LC-MS/MS

Poster presented at NACRW 2016

Joseph Kolb1, Ariana Ramdin1, Ryan Undeen1, Dennis Peterson2, Sam Ellis2 Lisa Wanders2
1Merieux NutriSciences Corporation, Gainsville, FL 32607
2Thomson Instrument Company, Oceanside, CA 92054

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Presentation

Improved Sample Preparation of Biological Samples Using the Thomson eXtreme|FV®& Analysis by LC-MS/MS

Presentation presented at MSACL 2016

no citations

Poster

Improved Sample Preparation for the Analysis of 12 Opiates in Urine using the Thomson eXtreme Filter Vials®by LC-MS/MS

Poster presented at MSACL 2016

Nadine Koenig1, Crystal Xander1, Melanie Stauffer1, Dean Fritch2, Lisa Wanders3, Dennis Peterson3, Sam Ellis3
1Health Network Laboratories, 794 Roble Road, Allentown, PA 18109
2Analytical Associates, 225 Millwood Drive, East Greenville, PA
3Thomson Instrument Company, 1121 South Cleveland Street Oceanside, CA 92054

Poster

Quick and Easy Sample Preparation of Urine for the Analysis of Psychoactive Drugs using the Thomson eXtreme Filter Vials®by LC-MS/MS

Poster presented at MSACL 2016

Nadine Koenig1, Crystal Xander1, Melanie Stauffer1, Dean Fritch2, Lisa Wanders3, Dennis Peterson3, Sam Ellis3
1Health Network Laboratories, 794 Roble Road, Allentown, PA 18109
2Analytical Associates, 225 Millwood Drive, East Greenville, PA
3Thomson Instrument Company, 1121 South Cleveland Street Oceanside, CA 92054

Poster

MSACL 2016 Cost Effective Dilute-and-shoot Approach For Determination of Illicit Drugs in Oral Fluids Using LC-MS/MS

Poster presented by Molecular Testing Labs at MSACL 2016

Kavinda De Silva, Mariko Nakano, Siobhan McKenney-Hara
Molecular Testing Labs. Vancouver, WA

Presentation

Use of Multiplexing and Alternative Sample Preparation Techniques for High Throughput Toxicological Screening

Presentation by Jill Yeakel - Lehigh Valley Toxicology

Jill Yeakel-Lehigh Valley Toxicology

Presentation

43rd International HPLC Zicheng Yang and Louis Maljers - Screening and Quantitation of 215 Pesticides in Honey by an Integrated On-Line Extraction UHPLC-MS/MS System

Presentation at 43rd International HPLC by Zicheng Yang and Louis Maljers-Bruker

Zicheng Yang and Louis Maljers, September 23, 2015, Bruker Daltonics, CA 94538, USA

Poster

Pesticide Analysis in Ground Water

Poster presented at AOAC 2015

Olga Almaraz, Blake Gentry, Stephanie Benton, Steven Perez
Adpen Laboratories, Inc., 11757 Central Parkway, Jacksonville, Florida 32224

Poster

Pesticide Analysis in Fruit/Vegetable Juice by LC/MS/MS and GC/MS

Poster presented at AOAC 2015

Z.Yang, L. Maljers, Bruker, Chemical & Applied Markets (CAM) Division | Uday Sathe, Karin Aylozyan @ Micro Quality Labs, Burbank, CA

Poster

Multiclass Multi-Residue Analysis of >100 Veterinary Drug Residues in Bovine Tissues by Filter Vial Dispersive-SPE & LC-MS/MS

Poster presented at AOAC 2015

Steven J. Lehotay, Marilyn J. Schneider, and Alan R. Lightfield
U. S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Eastern Regional Research Center; 600 East Mermaid Lane; Wyndmoor, PA 19038; USA

Poster

Analysis of Pesticides and Antibiotics in Honey by an Integrated On-Line Extraction UHPLC-MS/MS System

Poster presented at AOAC 2015

Zicheng Yang and Louis Maljers
Bruker Daltonics Inc., 3500 West Warren Ave, Fremont, CA 94538

Poster

Zicheng Yang and Louis Maljers Screening and Quantitation of About 200 Pesticides in Honey by an Integrated On-Line Extraction UHPLC-MS/MS System

Poster pesented at NACRW 2015 by Zicheng Yang and Louis Maljers-Bruker Daltonics Inc., Fremont, CA

Zicheng Yang and Louis Maljers Bruker Daltonics Inc., 3500 West Warren Ave, Fremont, CA 94538

Poster

Streamlined Sample Preparation Methodology to enable Higher Recovery, and minimize loss of Pesticides, Fungicides and Antibiotics by LC/MS or GC/MS

Poster presented at NACRW 2015

Lisa Wanders, Joe Machamer-Thomson Instrument Company Oceanside, CA

Poster

Improved Method for the Analysis of a Pain Management Supplemental Panel in Urine using the Thomson eXtreme|FV® by LC-MS/MS

Poster presented at ASMS 2015

Nadine Koenig1, Crystal Xander1, Melanie Stauffer1, Dean Fritch2, Lisa Wanders3, Sam Ellis3
1Health Network Laboratories, 794 Roble Road, Allentown, PA 18109
2Analytical Associates, 225 Millwood Drive, East Greenville, PA
3Thomson Instrument Company, 1121 South Cleveland Street Oceanside, CA 92054

Poster

Improved Sample Prep of Fruit & Juices for Analysis by Mass Spectrometry Using Thomson Filter Vials

Poster presented at ASMS 2015

Multiple papers used

Poster

Improved Method for the Analysis of 31 Drugs of Abuse/Pain Management Panel in Oral Fluid Samples using the Thomson eXtreme|FV® by LC-MS/MS

Poster presented at ASMS 2015

Nadine Koenig1, Crystal Xander1, Melanie Stauffer1, Dean Fritch2, Lisa Wanders3, Sam Ellis3
1Health Network Laboratories, 794 Roble Road, Allentown, PA 18109
2OraSure Technologies, Inc. 150 Webster Street, Bethlehem, PA 18015
3Thomson Instrument Company, 1121 South Cleveland Street Oceanside, CA 92054

Poster

ASMS 2015 - Improved Sample Prep of Meat & Fish for Contaminate Analysis by LC/MS using Thomson eXtractor3D|FV™

Poster presented at ASMS 2015

Multiple papers used

Poster

High Throughput Screening and confirmation of 41 Pain Panel Drugs in Oral Fluid by an Integrated On-Line Extraction UHPLC-MS/MS System

Poster presented at MSACL 2015 by Louis Maljers, Zicheng Yang-Bruker Daltonics Inc., Premont, CA

Louis Maljers, Zicheng Yang-Bruker Daltonics Inc., Premont, CA

Poster

Improved Method for the Analysis of 31 Drugs of Abuse/Pain Management Panel in Oral Fluid Samples using the Thomson eXtreme|FV® by LC-MS/MS

Poster presented at MSACL 2015

Nadine Koenig1, Crystal Xander1, Melanie Stauffer1, Dean Fritch2, Lisa Wanders3, Sam Ellis3
1Health Network Laboratories, 794 Roble Road, Allentown, PA 18109
2OraSure Technologies, Inc. 150 Webster Street, Bethlehem, PA 18015
3Thomson Instrument Company, 1121 South Cleveland Street Oceanside, CA 92054

Poster

Improved Method for the Analysis of a Pain Management Supplemental Panel in Urine using the Thomson eXtreme|FV® by LC-MS/MS

Poster presented at MSACL 2015

Nadine Koenig1, Crystal Xander1, Melanie Stauffer1, Dean Fritch2, Lisa Wanders3, Sam Ellis3
1Health Network Laboratories, 794 Roble Road, Allentown, PA 18109
2Analytical Associates, 225 Millwood Drive, East Greenville, PA
3Thomson Instrument Company, 1121 South Cleveland Street Oceanside, CA 92054

Poster

Screening and Quantitation of 250 Pesticides in Fruit Juices with Positive/Negative Switching LC/MS/MS

Poster presented at Florida Pesticide Residue Workshop 2014 by Bruker (CAM)

Zicheng Yang and Louis Maljers-Bruker, Chemical & Applied Markets Division, Fremont, CA

Poster

Routine Targeted Quantitation and Identification of Pesticide Residues using Triple Quadrupole LC-MS/MS and Advanced Scheduling of MRM Transitions

Poster presented by AB Sciex

AB Sciex

Poster

Multiclass multiresidue analysis of >100 veterinary drug residues in bovine tissues by filter-vial dispersive-SPE and LC-MS/MS

Poster by USDA

Steven J. Lehotay, Marilyn J. Schneider, and Alan R. Lightfield
U. S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Eastern Regional Research Center;
600 East Mermaid Lane; Wyndmoor, PA 19038; USA

Poster

New Sample Preparation Methodology to Enable Higher Recovery and Minimize Loss of Difficult Analytes in Food and Natural Products by LC/MS or GC/MS

Poster presented at Midwest AOAC 2014

Lisa Wanders, Sam Ellis, Joe Machamer, Thomson Instrument Company, Oceanside, CA

Poster

New Sample Preparation Methodology to Enable Higher Recovery and Minimize Loss of Difficult Analytes in Food and Natural Products by LC/MS or GC/MS

Poster presented at NACRW 2014

Lisa Wanders, Sam Ellis, Joe Machamer, Thomson Instrument Company, Oceanside, CA

Poster

Improved Sample Clean-up Options For Contaminant Analysis For Juices And Water By GC/MS And LC/MS

Poster presented at IUPAC 2014

Lisa Wanders, Sam Ellis, Joe Machamer-Thomson Instrument Company, Oceanside, CA

Poster

Improved Sample Clean-up Options for Contaminant Analysis for Vegetation, Meats & Seafood

Poster presented at IUPAC 2014

Lisa Wanders, Sam Ellis, Joe Machamer, Thomson Instrument Company, Oceanside, CA

Publication

Minimize enzyme and antibiotic use, maximize ethanol yield with accurate HPLC testing

Biomass Products & Technology Publication

Sam Ellis & Emma Murphy, Thomson Instrument Company

Poster

Comparison of different methods of extraction for incurred contaminants in fish

Poster presented at IUPAC 2014 by USDA

Yelena Sapozhnikova & Steven J. Lehotay
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Eastern Regional Research Center; 600 East Mermaid Lane; Wyndmoor, PA 19038; USA

Publication

How to Efficiently Shake Viscous Culture Broths Culture Broth Viscosity Evaluated in Shake Flasks Studies

In biotechnology, the use of shake flasks is widespread due to their easy handling, especially in process design and optimization as well as in small-scale upstream processing and inoculum production. Recently, geometrically optimized Thomson Optimum Growth™ shake flasks were introduced to the market, promoting higher yields with the same shaker footprint.

Jolanda Meister , Rüdiger W. Maschke , Soren Werner , Gernot T. John, Ph.D. , Dieter Eibl, Ph.D., Ph.D.

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Poster

Eliminating Steps in the Bioprocess Pipeline with Aseptic Optimum Growth™ Sampling Flasks

Poster presented at BioProcess 2016

Sam Ellis, Joe Machamer, Mike MyLymuk, Ana Sirianni, Thomson Instrument Company, Oceanside, CA

Poster

Scalable Transient CHO Method that in 7-12 days may become Stable Cell Pools & Stable Lines for Quantities needed in Toxicology Studies

Poster presented at BioProcess 2016

Joseph Abad2, James Brady2, Weili Wang2, Joe Machamer1, Ana Sirianni1, Sam Ellis1
1Thomson Instrument Company, Oceanside, CA
2Maxcyte, Gaithersburg, MD

Poster

PEGS 2016 Speed Improvement in Mid-Scale Biological Processes in: CHO, Hybridoma, HEK 293 and Cell Lines Using Single Use Optimum Growth™ Flasks 125mL-5L with Additional Features

Poster presented at PEGS 2016

Sam Ellis, Joe Machamer, Mike MyLymuk, Dennis Peterson, Ana Sirianni, Thomson Instrument Company, Oceanside, CA

Poster

Maximizing Cell Line Development Time: Minimizing FTE Time with Optimum Growth™ Flasks & Additions

Poster presented at PEGS 2016

Sam Ellis, Joe Machamer, Mike MyLymuk, Dennis Peterson, Ana Sirianni, Thomson Instrument Company, Oceanside, CA

Poster

Speed Improvement in Mid-Scale Biological Processes in: CHO, Hybridoma, HEK 293 and Cell Lines Using Single Use Optimum Growth Flasks 125mL-5L Flasks with Additional Features

Poster presented at PEP Talk 2016

Sam Ellis, Dennis Peterson, Mike MyLymuk, David Wadsworth, Thomson Instrument Company, Oceanside, CA

Presentation

CHOgro® Expression System:High titer transient transfection system for suspension CHO cells

Presentation given by Mirus® at PEP Talk 2016

Mirus® Bio LLC

Publication

Twists and Turns in Protein Expression: In Early Drug Discovery it’s Often Unclear Which Recombinant Proteins Will Be Affected by Changing the Host Cell

Challenges associated with E. coli include lengthy purification, protein aggregation, and inefficient refolding. These drawbacks can be overcome with an expression platform ...

Angelo DePalma, Ph.D.

Publication

Evolution of Shake Flask Technology: Novel Product Introductions Offer Advantages by Increasing DNA and Protein Production

GEN Article

Daniel Bruecher, Ph.D.

Poster

Development and Optimization of CHOgro™ Transient Expression Technologies for High Titer Antibody Production in Suspension CHO cells

Poster presented at BioProcess 2015 by Mirus®

Anthony Lauer1, James Ludtke1, Chuenchanok Khodthong1, Shannon Bruse1,2 and Laura Juckem1
1Mirus Bio LLC, Madison, Wisconsin USA, 2Current affiliation: Regeneron Genetics Center, Tarrytown, New York USA

Poster

Bridging the Gap in Screening and Scale Up in Insect, CHO, Hybridoma, and HEK293 Cell Lines (Single Use Optimum Growth Flasks 125mL-5L Flasks with Transfer Caps, and Ports)

Poster presented at PEGS 2015

Sam Ellis & Joe Machamer, Thomson Instrument Company, Oceanside, CA

Poster

PepTalk 2015, Optimum Growth, Max-Planck Institute of Biochemistry, A new shaped rocking biorector for insect & mammalian cells

Poster presented at PepTalk 2015 by Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry

Judith Scholz and Sabine Suppmann, Biochemistry Core Facility, Max-Planck Institute of Biochemistry, D-82152 Martinsried, Germany, suppmann@biochem.mpg.de

Poster

Optimum Growth™ Transfer Caps Fast Aseptic Sterile Transfer of Fluids for Bioprocess from Flasks to Bags or Bioreactors

Poster presented at PepTalk 2015

Julie Olson, Lisa Wanders, Joe Machamer, Julie Gallagher, Sam Ellis, Thomson Instrument Company, Oceanside, CA

Publication

Twists and Turns in Protein Expression: In Early Drug Discovery it’s Often Unclear Which Recombinant Proteins Will Be Affected by Changing the Host Cell

Challenges associated with E. coli include lengthy purification, protein aggregation, and inefficient refolding. These drawbacks can be overcome with an expression platform ...

Angelo DePalma, Ph.D.

Publication

Evolution of Shake Flask Technology: Novel Product Introductions Offer Advantages by Increasing DNA and Protein Production

Before and for a time after the research career of Louis Pasteur, microbiology essentially remained a static task. Glass bottles would rest on shelves until the contents were analyzed. This all changed in 1949, when the Nobel Prize was awarded for the development of the antibiotic streptomycin.

Daniel Bruecher, Ph.D.

Publication

Crystal Structure of a Novel Dimeric Form of NS5A Domain I Protein from Hepatitis C Virus

A new protein expression vector design utilizing an N-terminal six-histidine tag and tobacco etch virus protease cleavage site upstream of the hepatitis C virus NS5A sequence has resulted in a more straightforward purification method and improved yields of purified NS5A domain I protein.

Robert A. Love*, Oleg Brodsky, Michael J. Hickey, Peter A. Wells and Ciarán N. Cronin Structural Biology Group, Pfizer Global Research and Development, La Jolla Laboratories, San Diego, California 92121 *Corresponding author

Publication

Economical parallel protein expression screening and scale-up with the Ultra Yield Flasks™

A novel microfermentation and scale-up platform for parallel protein production in Escherichia coli is described. ... Experimental data is presented demonstrating that the Ultra Yield flask generates, on average, an equivalent amount of recombinant protein per unit cell culture density as do traditional shake flask designs but at a substantially greater amount per unit volume.

Brodsky O1, Cronin CN
1Department of Structural Biology, Pfizer Global Research and Development, 10628 Science Center Drive, La Jolla, CA 92121, USA.

Publication

Strategies to maximize heterologous protein expression in Escherichia coli with minimal cost

Automation and miniaturization are key issues of high-throughput research projects in the post-genomic era. ... In this review, we describe recent efforts to continue to minimize the cost for the parallel processing of multiple protein targets and focus on those materials and strategies that are highly suitable for the traditional academic laboratory.

Wolfgang Peti1, Rebecca Page2
1 Brown University, Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biotechnology, Box G-E3, Providence, RI 02912, USA
2 Brown University, Department of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry, Box G-E4, Providence, RI 02912, USA

Publication

High-yield production of biologically active recombinant protein in shake flask culture by combination of enzyme-based glucose delivery and increased oxygen transfer

[R]eport describes the combined use of an enzyme-based glucose release system (EnBase®) and high-aeration shake flask (Ultra Yield Flask™). The benefit of this combination is demonstrated by over 100-fold improvement in the active yield of recombinant alcohol dehydrogenase expressed in E. coli

Kaisa Ukkonen1,2*, Antti Vasala1, Heikki Ojamo2 and Peter Neubauer3
1BioSilta Oy, P. O. Box 4300, FI-90014 Oulu, Finland. 2Bioprocess Engineering Laboratory, Department of Process and Environmental Engineering, University of Oulu, P. O. Box 4300, FI-90014 Oulu, Finland. 3Chair of Bioprocess Engineering, Department of Biotechnology, Technische Universität Berlin, Ackerstrasse 71-76, D-13355 Berlin, Germany.

Presentation

Strategies for Maximizing Heterologous Protein Expression in E. coli with Minimal Cost

Presentation given by Rebecca Page at ABRF 2007 Recombinant Protein Satellite Workshop held in Tampa: &ldquolState-of-the-Art Technologies for Producing High-Quality Recombinant Proteins in Core Facilities.”

Rebecca Page Rebecca Page, Department of Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Department of Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Poster

eXtreme|FV® Extraction for the Detection of 11 Antidepressants in Oral Fluid Samples

While a urine sample provides a longer detection window and more comprehensive analysis of drug use, oral fluid is a viable option for testing1,2. The benefits of using oral fluid include the ability to detect recent drug use, ease of collection, and the collection process can be observed to prevent adulteration of the sample3. ... Thomson [eXtreme|FV®] provide a simple and efficient extraction technique that has demonstrated adequate analyte recovery, reduced matrix interferences and the elimination of solvent waste and other consumables. This project specifically explores the efficacy of these vials in extracting a wide range of antidepressants in oral fluid specimens.

Sarah Muller1, Jill Yeakel1, Lisa Wanders2 1Lehigh Valley Toxicology, Bethlehem, PA 2Thomson Instrument Company, Oceanside, CA

Publication

General methods for flash chromatography using disposable columns

As technology has evolved available guidelines for normal-phase flash chromatography have become less relevant. Years of experience performing chromatography with disposable columns have been condensed into simple guidelines useful for translating TLC results into either isocratic- or gradient-flash chromatography. The described studies should provide researchers with a means of selecting adequate columns and guidelines to reduce the waste of solvents, silica, time, and money.

William C. Stevens Jr., Daniel C. Hill

Publication

Economical parallel protein expression screening and scale-up in Escherichia coli

A novel microfermentation and scale-up platform for parallel protein production in Escherichia colii> is described. The vertical shaker device Vertiga, which generates low-volume high density (A600 ~ 20) Escherichia coli cultures in 96-position deep-well plates without auxiliary oxygen supplementation, has been coupled to a new disposable shake flask design, the Ultra Yield™ flask, that allows for equally high cell culture densities to be obtained. The Ultra Yield™ flask, which accommodates up to 1L in culture volume, has a baffled base and a more vertical wall construction compared to traditional shake flask designs. Experimental data is presented demonstrating that the Ultra Yield™ flask generates, on average, an equivalent amount of recombinant protein per unit cell culture density as do traditional shake flask designs but at a substantially greater amount per unit volume. The combination of Vertiga and the Ultra Yield™ flask provides a convenient and scalable low-cost solution to parallel protein production in Escherichia coli.

Oleg Brodsky, Ciarán N. Cronin

Poster

New Invention: Harvesting CHO and HEK293 Cells with the Rapid Clear® Cap provides 0.2μm sterile filtration in a fraction of the time required by traditional clarification methods

Poster presented at PepTalk 2017 on the Rapid Clear® Cap

Author: Sam Ellis3, Eric Ailor1, Charles Dillard2, Ana Sirianni3, Lisa Wanders3
1Mapp Biopharmaceutical, Inc., San Diego, CA; 2Dart NueroScience, San Diego, CA; 3Thomson Instrument Company, Oceanside, CA

Poster

Automated Hydrolysis and Sample Preparation for the Analysis of 12 Opiates in Urine using the Thomson eXtreme Filter Vials® by LC-MS/MS

Poster presented at MSACL 2017 on the Analysis of 12 Opiates in Urine

Nadine Koenig1, Crystal Xander1, Melanie Stauffer1, Dean Fritch2, Lisa Wanders3, Dennis Peterson3, Sam Ellis3
1 Health Network Laboratories, 794 Roble Road, Allentown, PA 18109
2 Analytical Associates, 225 Millwood Drive, East Greenville, PA
3Thomson Instrument Company, 1121 South Cleveland Street Oceanside, CA 92054

Poster

Ultra Yield™ Flask New Additions: New Flask Sizes & Bi-directional Transfer Cap

Poster Presented at PEGS 2017

Author: Sam Ellis1, Ana Sirianni1, Matt Hoss1, Lisa Wanders1
1Thomson Instrument Company, Oceanside, CA

Poster

A Platform to Rapidly Purify and Formulate Immunoglobulins from Mammalian Expression Systems

Poster Presented at PEGS 2017 by Aragen

Rene Pagila, Indira Kottayil, Nikita Patel, Sharleen Rojas, Sonam Sharma, Felix Vega, Jacqueline Wilde, Verginie Manard-Rose, Timothy Myles

Poster

Time saving sample prep for the analysis of 54 pesticide & aflatoxin residues in Cannabis by LC-MS/MS

Pesticide analysis of cannabis leaves and finished goods is becoming increasingly important as many states are legalizing it for medicinal and recreational purposes. Dosing methods include smoking/vaporizing and edibles but cannabis is still a Schedule 1 illegal drug and therefore have no FDA testing guidelines. Trace levels of pesticides can be incurred during cultivation or inhaled from dried pesticides on the cannabis. This study evaluates the sample preparation aspect for LC-MS/MS analysis of a 54 analyte panel of pesticides, fungicides and aflatoxins. QuEChERS was used to extract the analytes from the cannabis flowers, followed by centrifugation and Thomson Standard Filter Vial for sample clean-up.

Tami Nguyen1, Kavinda De Silva1, Lisa Wanders2
1 Molecular Testing Labs, Vancouver, WA 98684
2 Thomson Instrument Company, Oceanside, CA 92054

Presentation

Detection of THC in oral fluid: the bane of a toxicologist's existence

MSACL 2017 talk by Jill Yeakel on THC detection in oral fluids

Jill Yeakel1
1 Lehigh Valley Toxicology

Publication

Screening to Small-Scale GMP Biomanufacture: Exploring a Simple, Unified Platform Strategy for Handling a Range of Cell-Culture Needs

The cell-line development process starts with in silico procedures combining codon-optimization algorithms, a secretion signal toolbox, flexible expression vector configurations, and high-productivity CHO-K1 cell lines.

Machine learning combined with in vitro screening is used to consider the end product and final process from the onset of the project. Process development can be done in parallel with clone development, thus reducing the number of steps and shortening the overall project time.

Andrew Magno, Gary Tompkins, Travis Scagliarini, Miles Scotcher, Ph.D.

Publication

Engineering characterization of Thomson Optimum Growth™ shake flasks with optimized geometry

The evolution of shaken flasks for biotechnological applications began in the 1940s with the increased interest in the microbial production of antibiotics [1]. The Nobel Prize awarded production of streptomycin by Streptomyces actinobacteria showed the main disadvantage of static cultures: slow growth. Hence, shaking platforms were constructed and an already established, readily available vessel was used: the Erlenmeyer flask [2]. Nowadays, the usage of shaking flasks is widespread due to their easy handling and thus, those reactors are preferred for use used in upstream processing [3]. In recent years, numerous articles about shake flask, e.g. about general engineering aspects [4], power consumption [3, 5-6], or gas exchange [7-8], have been published, underlining the importance of shake flask in biotechnology. However, the design hasn’t changed significantly. Erlenmeyer and Fernbach style shake flask are still the predominant designs [2], despite their disadvantages (e.g. the relatively low filling volumes [1]). Consequently, the Thomson Instrument Company introduced a new shake flask design for cell cultures (Optimum Growth™), claiming higher yield on the same shaker footprint [9]. This poster gives an overview of different procedural parameters for the 500 mL and 5 L Optimum Growth™ flasks, enabling scientist to compare and evaluate the new design and to choose suitable cultivation conditions.

Rüdiger W. Maschke1,3, Sören Werner1, Jolanda Meister1, Adrian Rohr1, Eric Abellan2, Dieter Eibl1, Thomas Bley3
1 Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Institute of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Wädenswil, Switzerland
2 Infors AG, Rittergasse 27, 4103 Bottmingen, Switzerland
3 Technische Universität Dresden (TUD), Institute of Food Technology and Bioprocess Engineering, Dresden, Germany

Poster

eXtreme Filter Vial Extraction for the Detection of Fentanyl & Analogues in Oral Fluid Samples

Use of oral fluid (saliva) in toxicology has been increasing within recent years due to its non-invasive, low cost effectiveness in recent drug use detection. There is little opportunity for adulteration of the sample and a large volume is not required for collection and analysis. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has proven to be a useful tool in the analysis of oral fluid due to its ability to run highly sensitive assays1. The necessity for a sensitive assay is especially important in the detection of an analyte and its analogues that are administered in low concentrations. Detection of fentanyl and its analogues such as furanyl fentanyl and sufentanil, have become important due to the increasing widespread use of illicit fentanyl formulations in heroin and counterfeit opioid tablet formulations. Suppliers of illicit heroin are developing fentanyl analogues and including them as cutting agents in the final product due to their high potency and relatively low production cost2. As a result, development of a method to detect these compounds has become vital to many toxicology labs. Thomson eXtreme Filter Vials provide a simple and efficient extraction technique that has demonstrated adequate analyte recovery, reduced matrix interferences from a simple dilute-and-shoot method and the elimination of solvent waste and other consumables. This project specifically explores the efficacy of these vials in extracting a range of fentanyl analogues in oral fluid specimens.

Stevi Hooper1, Jill Yeakel1, Lisa Wanders2
1Lehigh Valley Toxicology, Bethlehem, PA 2Thomson Instrument Company, Oceanside, CA

Poster

Optimizing Small Scale Devices for Antibody Screening

The Thomson Optimum Growth™ Family of products is expanding to include culturing and purifying in 96 & 24 well plate format. The 96 & 24 well plates offer a scalable option that work in conjunction with 125mL & 250mL Optimum Growth™ Flasks and Ultra Yield™ Flasks. Here we present data optimizing growth conditions and filtration options.

Ana Sirianni, Mark Rehse, Sam Ellis, Thomson Instrument Company, Oceanside, CA

Poster

New Innovation: Harvesting CHO and HEK293 Cells with the Rapid Clear® Cap provides 0.2μm filtration in a fraction of the time and requires less consumables than other clarification methods

When producing biologics, cell yield, viability, and effective clarification are critical. Thomson’s patented Optimum Growth™ Flask facilitates scalable mixing and high gas exchange rates to produce high density yields of viable cells. Now, to extend the Optimum Growth™ Flask product line into downstream processing, Thomson has developed a revolutionary new technology to perform high speed clarification of cellular material. The Rapid Clear Cap® 3000 eliminates the multiple transfer steps involved in clarification and will filter between 2L-4L of high density culture in under 35 minutes. This technique transforms the time consuming and laborious process of harvesting cells to a rapid, eco-friendly walk away procedure.

Author: Daniel Korostyshevsky, Sam Ellis
Thomson Instrument Company, Oceanside, CA

Poster

Simplified sample preparation of antibodies for purity determination by SEC-HPLC using Thomson Filter Vials

Protein aggregation in therapeutic products has become a major concern for the pharmaceutical industry and regulatory agencies. Protein aggregates can cause adverse patient immune responses and therefore are typically monitored throughout the formulation and production of bio-therapeutics. Monitoring aggregates by HPLC during production, storage and shipping is a part of the process of optimizing early formulations to minimize risk in clinical applications. Many clean-up techniques used to prepare cell culture samples prior to HPLC/UPLC provide incomplete clean-up, are time consuming, and waste precious sample. The presence of cellular debris remaining after sample preparation can lead to analytical instrument performance issues and will shorten column life. Here, we demonstrate how the use of Thomson Filter Vials for sample preparation allows for the analysis of low volume samples, processed in less time, with minimal sample loss and fewer transfer steps while extending column lifetimes and reducing HPLC/UPLC downtime.

Author: Lisa Wanders, Mark Rehse, Sam Ellis
Thomson Instrument Company, Oceanside, CA

Poster

Fast and Simple Creatinine Determination in Wastewater by Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

A fast and simple method was developed to determine creatinine in wastewater samples with high sensitivity (LOQ 0.01 μg/mL) and specificity (2 MRM transitions per analyte). The developed method could be applied to urine samples (dilution cut-off 20 mg/dL) as well. Creatinine was detected in all authentic wastewater samples with concentrations from 0.22 to 2.68 g/mL, and it should be further investigated as a normalization factor in wastewater analysis.

Nicole Centazzo1, Bonnie-Marie Frederick1, Daniel Korostyshevsky2, Lisa Wanders2, Marta Concheiro-Guisan1*
1Department of Sciences, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York, New York, NY 2Thomson Instrument Company, Oceanside, CA

Publication

Overexpression and purification of Dicer and accessory proteins for biochemical and structural studies

The Dicer family of ribonucleases plays a key role in small RNA-based regulatory pathways by generating short dsRNA fragments that modulate expression of endogenous genes, or protect the host from invasive nucleic acids. Beginning with its initial discovery, biochemical characterization of Dicer has provided insight about its catalytic properties. However, a comprehensive understanding of how Dicer’s domains contribute to substrate-specific recognition and catalysis is lacking. One reason for this void is the lack of high-resolution structural information for a metazoan Dicer in the apo- or substrate-bound state. Both biochemical and structural studies are facilitated by large amounts of highly purified, active protein, and Dicer enzymes have historically been recalcitrant to overexpression and purification. Here we describe optimized procedures for the large-scale expression of Dicer in baculovirus-infected insect cells. We then outline a three-step protocol for the purification of large amounts (3–4 mg of Dicer per liter of insect cell culture) of highly purified and active Dicer protein, suitable for biochemical and structural studies. Our methods are general and are extended to enable overexpression, purification and biochemical characterization of accessory dsRNA binding proteins that interact with Dicer and modulate its catalytic activity.

Niladri K. Sinha* and Brenda L. Bass*
Department of Biochemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA

Publication

Automated Removal of Phospholipids from Membrane Proteins for H/D Exchange Mass Spectrometry Workflows

Membrane proteins are currently the most common targets for pharmaceuticals. However, characterization of their structural dynamics by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is sparse due to insufficient automated methods to handle full-length membrane proteins in lipid bilayers. Additionally, membrane lipids used to mimic the membrane environment and to solubilize membrane proteins can impair chromatography performance and cause ion suppression in the mass spectrometer. The workflow discussed herein advances HDX-MS capabilities and other MS applications for membrane proteins by providing a fully automated method for HDX-MS analysis based on a phospholipid removal scheme compatible with robotic handling. Phospholipids were depleted from protein samples by the addition of zirconium oxide beads, which were subsequently removed by inline filtration using syringeless nanofilters. To demonstrate this method, single-pass transmembrane protein FcγRIIa (CD32a) expressed into liposomes was used. Successful depletion of phospholipids ensured optimal liquid-chromatography−mass-spectrometry performance, and measurement of peptides from the transmembrane domain of FcγRIIa indicated phospholipids associated with this region were either not present or did not shield the transmembrane domain from digestion by pepsin. Furthermore, amino acid sequence coverage provided by this method was suitable to enable future measurement of structural dynamics of ectodomain, transmembrane domain, and endodomain of FcγRIIa. Moreover, this method is the first to enable fully automated HDX-MS on full-length transmembrane proteins in lipid bilayers, a notable advancement to facilitate understanding of membrane proteins, development of pharmaceuticals, and characterization for regulatory agencies.

Kyle W. Anderson1, 2 Elyssia S. Gallagher1, 2 and Jeffrey W. Hudgens1, 2
1Biomolecular Measurement Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899, United States
2Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research, Rockville, Maryland 20850, United States

Publication

Application of Assisted Design of Antibody and Protein Therapeutics (ADAPT) improves efficacy of a Clostridium difficile toxin A singledomain antibody

In this study, we examined the applicability of the ADAPT platform to sdAb affinity maturation while continuing our efforts towards improved therapies for Clostridium difficile infections (CDI). Treatment of CDI with antibiotics can result in recurrent forms of this highly common and costly hospital-acquired disease. With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant and hypervirulent C. difficile strains, CDI-associated health-care costs and morbidity rates have prompted alternative treatment modalities including vaccines, fecal transplantation, probiotics and antibody-based immunotherapy. With regard to antibody-based immunotherapy, a number of mAbs targeting and neutralizing C. difficile virulence-factor toxins A and B (TcdA and TcdB) have been discovered, with the anti-TcdB mAb bezlotoxumab recently passing a Phase III clinical trial and obtaining FDA-approval. SdAbs are also attractive immunotherapeutics, as they present several advantages over mAbs, primarily in terms of ability to access cryptic and concave epitopes, increased stabilities, high modularity and smaller size, thus potentially leading to excellent efficacy, pharmacokinetics and developability profiles.

Traian Sulea 1, 2, Greg Hussack 3, Shannon Ryan 3, Jamshid Tanha 3, 4 & Enrico O. Purisima 1, 5

1Human Health Therapeutics Research Centre, National Research Council Canada, 6100 Royalmount Avenue, Montreal, Quebec, H4P 2R2, Canada.
2Institute of Parasitology, McGill University, 21111 Lakeshore Road, Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec, H9X 3V9, Canada.
3Human Health Therapeutics Research Centre, National Research Council Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0R6, Canada.
4Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, 451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, K1H 8M5, Canada.
5Department of Biochemistry, McGill University, 3655 Promenade Sir William Osler, Montreal, Quebec, H3G 1Y6, Canada.

Publication

Fluorescent proteins such as eGFP lead to catalytic oxidative stress in cells

Fluorescent proteins are an important tool that has become omnipresent in life sciences research. They are frequently used for localization of proteins and monitoring of cells. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) was the first and has been the most used fluorescent protein. Enhanced GFP (eGFP) was optimized from wild-type GFP for increased fluorescence yield and improved expression in mammalian systems. Many GFP-like fluorescent proteins have been discovered, optimized or created, such as the red fluorescent protein TagRFP. Fluorescent proteins are expressed colorless and immature and, for eGFP, the conversion to the fluorescent form, mature, is known to produce one equivalent of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) per molecule of chromophore. Even though it has been proposed that this process is non-catalytic and generates nontoxic levels of H2O2, this study investigates the role of fluorescent proteins in generating free radicals and inducing oxidative stress in biological systems. Immature eGFP and TagRFP catalytically generate the free radical superoxide anion (O2 •–) and H2O2 in the presence of NADH. Generation of the free radical O2 •– and H2O2 by eGFP in the presence of NADH affects the gene expression of cells. Many biological pathways are altered, such as a decrease in HIF1α stabilization and activity. The biological pathways altered by eGFP are known to be implicated in the pathophysiology of many diseases associated with oxidative stress; therefore, it is critical that such experiments using fluorescent proteins are validated with alternative methodologies and the results are carefully interpreted. Since cells inevitably experience oxidative stress when fluorescent proteins are expressed, the use of this tool for cell labeling and in vivo cell tracing also requires validation using alternative methodologies.

Douglas Ganini a, 1, Fabian Leinisch a, 1, 2, Ashutosh Kumar a, JinJie Jiang a, Erik J. Tokar b, Christine C. Malone c, Robert M. Petrovich c, Ronald P. Mason a

a Free Radical Biology, Immunity, Inflammation & Disease Laboratory, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA
b Stem Cell Toxicology Group, National Toxicology Program Laboratory, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA
c Protein Expression Core Facility, Genome Integrity and Structural Biology Laboratory, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA

This research was supported by the Intramural Research Program of the NIEHS, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences/NIH.
* Correspondence to: Free Radical Metabolites Group, Immunity, Inflammation & Disease Laboratory, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA.
1 Authors equally contributed to this work.
2 Current address: University of Copenhagen, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Cellular and Metabolic Research Section, Blegdamsvej 3, 2200 København N, 4.5, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Publication

Direct Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Glyphosate, AMPA, Glufosinate, and MPPA in Water Without Derivatization

This article describes a direct analysis of glyphosate, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), glufosinate, and 3-methylphosphinicopropionic acid (MPPA) in water by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) without derivatization. The chromatographic separation was performed using a hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) column and typical LC–MS mobile phases. Method performance was evaluated, showing excellent results. The low limits of quantification (LLOQs) obtained meet the requirements of EU guidelines and could also be used to get an agreement in France where regulations require lower LLOQs (NOR: DEVL1703763V).

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Publication

An LCMS Method for the Detection of Cocoa Butter Substitutes, Replacers, and Equivalents in Commercial Chocolate-like Products

There is increasing demand for genuine cocoa butter (CB) in chocolate products in developed nations, however, this demand has created a shortage of CB and raised its costs. To overcome this, chocolate manufactures sometimes add vegetable-derived fats to some chocolate products to reduce costs while still maintaining desirable physical characteristics. It is of current interest to have a reliable method to detect, identify, and quantify the triacylglycerol (TAG) components of cocoa butter substitutes, replacers, and equivalents (CBEs) in chocolate products. Traditionally GC was used for this task, but due to the low volatility of triacylglycerides and their susceptibility to thermal decomposition, retention time is the only identifying factor for the TAGs and typical GC analyses of this type can take 40 minutes. LCMS is able to not only provide faster throughput, but also has the additional advantage of allowing characterization of the TAG, including qualitative regiospecific analysis. We have developed a single, UHPLC column-based LCMS method to analyze the TAG components in commercial chocolate and chocolate-like products. This analysis has a runtime of 17minutes, making it suitable for relatively high throughput. Additionally, the method was very repeatable, with an interday variability of <7% for the absolute area counts of the three major TAGs in CB (POP,POS,SOS).

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Poster

Sample Preparation for over 60 Analytes in Urine using the Thomson eXtreme Filter Vials® by LC-MS/MS

This improved sample preparation method allows for the quantitative measurement of over 60 different drugs in urine for clinical purposes. Drugs of abuse include naturally occurring, semi-synthetic and synthetic drugs. The use of hydrolysis in the analysis of natural and synthetic drugs in urine has become standard practice in toxicology labs. Many laboratories currently use Solid Phase Extraction or Supported. Liquid Extraction techniques in the sample preparation of urine. This method quantitatively measures multiple drugs of different classes in urine for clinical purposes. This method is known as the Clinical Urine Mega Method and run on the Sciex 4500 using the Phenomenex Kinetex Phenyl-Hexyl analytical column. The samples are hydrolyzed, then prepared using a dilute and filter technique followed by LC-MS/MS analysis.

Nadine Koenig1, Crystal Xander1, Dean Fritch2, Lisa Wanders3
1 Health Network Laboratories, 794 Roble Road, Allentown, PA 18109
2 Analytical Associates, 225 Millwood Drive, East Greenville, PA
3Thomson Instrument Company, 1121 South Cleveland Street Oceanside, CA 92054

Poster

Autosampler-Ready Microporous Filter Vials As A Viable Alternative For Microbiological Sample Processing

Presented at Systems Biology for Clinical Infectious Diseases Research Symposium 2019 Demand for high-throughput sample processing technologies will increaseas LC-based methods become more prevalent in academic and clinical microbiological research labs. Filter sterilization steps are required during the processing of microbiological samples because of the following. i) many bacteria and fungi are BSL2/3 level pathogens; ii) used broth media tend to contain solids; and,iii) chromatographic column longevity is required in a high-throughput laboratory. Introduction Project Aims

Thomas D. Horvath1,2, Sibel Ak1,2, Sigmund J. Haidacher1,2, Kathleen M Hoch1,2, Tor C. Savidge1,2, and Anthony M. Haag1,2
1Baylor College of Medicine, 2Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX. 77030

Publication

Method Consolidation to Improve Scope and Efficiency in Postmortem Toxicology

Systematic toxicological approaches that employ both ideology changes and improvements in instrumentation and sample extraction allow for improved toxicology testing efficiency through lower sensitivities, higher specificity and minimized resource use. Historically, the San Francisco Office of the Chief Medical Examiner relied heavily on a GC-MS testing regime, comprised of individual drug-class confirmation and quantitation assays. Traditional methods utilizing GC-MS typically require iterations of testing, exhausting sample volume, and hindering productivity and turnaround times. Particularly for polypharmacy cases frequently seen in modern postmortem toxicology. The method described here consolidated the scope of seven legacy methods into a single LC-MS/MS method for better sensitivity, higher throughput, quantitation of drugs of abuse with minimal sample consumption, and incorporation of smart automated processing for improved quality assurance. One hundred microlitres of blood or urine were rapidly extracted using a simple acetonitrile protein crash and subsequent in-vial filtration and injected on to an LC-MS/MS system. The developed method was fully validated to SWGTOX and international guidelines and incorporated 55 analytes and a customized query that facilitates rapid and consistent application of acceptability criteria for data processing and review. Applicability was demonstrated with the analysis of 1389 samples (858 blood and 531 urine) where at least 41% of positive results may have been potentially missed due to their decreased sensitivity, and 11% of results were not within the scope, of the previous analytical methods estimated. On average, cases in this study would have previously required three distinct GC-MS assays, 3 mL of blood, and upwards of 30 hours of active staff time. The described LC-MS/MS analytical approach has mitigated the need to perform multiple assays, utilized only 0.1 mL of sample, significantly reduced analyst work time, incorporated 10 additional analytes, and allowed for a more comprehensive testing regime to better inform cause of death determinations.

Jirair Gevorkyan 1 4, Megan Wong 1 5, Sue Pearring 1 6, Luke N. Rodda 1, 2 *
1 Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, San Francisco, California, USA, 2 Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA
* corresponding author: Luke.Rodda@sfgov.org; Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, City and County of San 12 Francisco, 1 Newhall Street, San Francisco, California 94124, USA; Tel: +1 415-641-3688

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