Engineering characterization of Thomson Optimum Growth™ shake flasks with optimized geometry

Rüdiger W. Maschke<sup>1</sup>,<sup>3</sup>, Sören Werner<sup>1</sup>, Jolanda Meister<sup>1</sup>, Adrian Rohr<sup>1</sup>, Eric Abellan<sup>2</sup>, Dieter Eibl<sup>1</sup>, Thomas Bley<sup>3</sup><br /><sup>1</sup> Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Institute of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Wädenswil, Switzerland<br /><sup>2</sup> Infors AG, Rittergasse 27, 4103 Bottmingen, Switzerland<br /><sup>3</sup> Technische Universität Dresden (TUD), Institute of Food Technology and Bioprocess Engineering, Dresden, Germany

The evolution of shaken flasks for biotechnological applications began in the 1940s with the increased interest in the microbial production of antibiotics [1]. The Nobel Prize awarded production of streptomycin by Streptomyces actinobacteria showed the main disadvantage of static cultures: slow growth. Hence, shaking platforms were constructed and an already established, readily available vessel was used: the Erlenmeyer flask [2]. Nowadays, the usage of shaking flasks is widespread due to their easy handling and thus, those reactors are preferred for use used in upstream processing [3]. In recent years, numerous articles about shake flask, e.g. about general engineering aspects [4], power consumption [3, 5-6], or gas exchange [7-8], have been published, underlining the importance of shake flask in biotechnology. However, the design hasn’t changed significantly. Erlenmeyer and Fernbach style shake flask are still the predominant designs [2], despite their disadvantages (e.g. the relatively low filling volumes [1]). Consequently, the Thomson Instrument Company introduced a new shake flask design for cell cultures (Optimum Growth™), claiming higher yield on the same shaker footprint [9]. This poster gives an overview of different procedural parameters for the 500 mL and 5 L Optimum Growth™ flasks, enabling scientist to compare and evaluate the new design and to choose suitable cultivation conditions.

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Title

Engineering characterization of Thomson Optimum Growth™ shake flasks with optimized geometry

Description

The evolution of shaken flasks for biotechnological applications began in the 1940s with the increased interest in the microbial production of antibiotics [1]. The Nobel Prize awarded production of streptomycin by Streptomyces actinobacteria showed the main disadvantage of static cultures: slow growth. Hence, shaking platforms were constructed and...

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Product Used

Optimum Growth™ 125mL Flask

PTFE 0.2µm Vent Cap for Increased Aeration | Sterile

pn#931110

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